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Next: How to Plot Geotagged Pictures on a map...

 

   

Geo-Tagging Photos

 

How do you "geotag" a photo?

There are several ways of geotagging photos.

          1. Connect your GPS to your Digital Camera

          2. Take pictures - Take GPS Coordinates - Collate later at your computer using software

          3. Take pictures - Use mapping program to get coordinates - Collate photos with coordinates using software.


Method 1.
Connect your GPS to your Digital Camera - Click here for more...

You must have a camera that is capable of being connected to a GPS.  For example, the Nikon D2H, D2X, D200 series digital cameras have external ports that can be connected directly to a GPS.  Cables and mounts can be purchased from NIKON, but I have found a cable that works with the NIKON D200 available from www.pc-mobile.com. For only 60 bucks, you can get yourself connected.

Some cameras can wirelessly connect to Bluetooth GPS's.  I know that RICOH makes a certain camera that can do that.  This would be nice not to have wires all over the place!

 

Continue to direct GPS geotagging...

 

Method 2. Take pictures - Take GPS Coordinates - Collate later at your computer using software

Most cameras do not have a port for connecting your GPS.  That leaves you with this next best solution.  You will need a software program.  I use RoboGeo.  There are MANY way to geotag your photos using this software. I think that this software is incredibly well designed!  Buy it!

 

Track logs

This is the easiest way.  This works only if your Camera's clock is set accurately.  It works like this: Load your photos into RoboGeo, Connect your GPS, Press the button.  Done.  Geocoded photos!  This would more than suffice for general usage, but it is not the most accurate means of geocoding photos.

 

Waypoints

This CAN be the most accurate way of geotagging.  If your GPS allows you to "average" a waypoint and collect the waypoint for a certain time interval, say 10 minutes, this will dramatically improve the accuracy of the waypoint, even getting down to less than a meter.  You just load the photos, Connect the GPS, Choose "waypoints", and choose the photo, then the waypoint number.  Done!  The only problem with this method is remembering which waypoint, for example 003, goes with which photo.  When taking notes from your camera, do not use the "photo # of #" number, use the actual file name, example: DSC_006.jpg.

 

Waypoint File

These are usually GPX files.  Many mapping programs will export a GPS waypoint file as a GPX file.  When you go out "geotagging" day after day, it would be great to clear your waypoints each day.  This way you can download each day's photo, with each day's waypoints, and keep them together in a file.  Using RoboGeo, it's easy.  Just collate photos with waypoints, once you've loaded the GPX file and the photos!

 

Method 3. Take pictures - Use mapping program to get coordinates - Collate photos with coordinates using software.

Again, RoboGeo will do this for you, with Google Earth.  I've had some trouble getting RoboGeo to "talk" to Google Earth on my computer.  This is evidently a problem with a firewall I run on my computer...

 

Continue to plotting Geotagged Photos...

 
     
           
   

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